2011 POST FIRE SURVEY – MESSENT CONSERVATION PARK

Cathy Houston

Conducted by the Conservation group of the Native Orchid Society of South Australia Inc. for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Members of the Native Orchid Society of South Australia and two volunteers conducted a three day orchid survey of Messent Conservation Park, following a prescribed burn that took place in March/April 2011.

The survey in burnt areas was undertaken from Friday 9th – Sunday 11th September, inclusive. A maximum of eleven people took part, not all being present for the entire survey time. Participants worked in pairs (or threes if numbers dictated such) and conducted ramble surveys within very rough grid areas of about 500 meters square. Because of the size of the burn area and access difficulty, none of the internal area was surveyed. However, many habitats were covered and extrapolation could predict what would be likely to occur in these areas. Some other vegetated areas were visited as well. These included flats covered in rushes, or sedges and rushes, a 16 month old prescribed burn area, a Pink gum (Eucalyptus fasciculosa) rise, mallee woodland and a Banksia herb-land.

Observations were taken of species present, numbers and any other detail of note, together with GPS location. A numbering code was used for most species.

The results were somewhat variable, presumably dependent on habitat types and their orchid population prior to the burn, the temperature of the burn and to a lesser extent, the emergence or otherwise of orchids prior to the time of burning. For instance, only one small population of Corunastylis (Genoplesium) was noted, this being a species that would have been flowering at the time of the burn. Similarly, no Eriochilus were observed in the survey area. However, Leporella fimbriata which emerges at a very similar time was present in some very large colonies.

The most abundant orchid by far was Pyrorchis nigricans. It was encountered in nearly all habitats of the survey area, the only exception being limestone ridges where it rarely appeared. Flowering had been promoted by the burn with perhaps about half the population in flower/going to flower. Density of the population fluctuated but it seemed to be consistently present. However, its absence was noteworthy from an area of burn undertaken in May 2010. The habitat was ideal for the species and given the proliferation throughout the 2011 burn one would have to speculate about the timing of that burn on that (and perhaps other) species. Very few species were located in that area at all. It has to be said in fairness though that the only Thelymitra epipactoides found in any burn area was seen in this 16 month old burn.

Perhaps the most orchid-rich habitat with regard to number of species was the limestone ridges. Some of the open flats had the least diversity. It was not easy to ascertain what the dominant vegetation had been in these areas. Conversely some of the flats had a good scattering of orchid species, the numbers of each being relatively low.

Winter flowering species were conspicuous by their low representation.  No Bunochilus (Pterostylis) were seen, few Urochilus (P.) sanguineus, Diplodium (P.) dolichochilum, Acianthus pusillus, Corysanthes (Corybas) species and Cyrtostylis robusta were seen in the burn area.  The only exception was Linguella (Pterostylis) sp. Mallee. It was encountered in small to medium sized colonies throughout the area, usually with a reasonable number of capsules developing. In a vegetated location Diplodium species was seen in good numbers.

Threats to orchids were minimal. Rabbits were present in noticeable numbers along the northern boundary. Similarly, there was some weed incursion along the northern boundary, Capeweed and one other being the main ones seen. Some predation was observed within the burn area, but nothing we would consider notable. Rabbit activity was also very evident in a flat/Pink gum rise on the track leading south to the boundary. Deer prints were observed throughout the areas we covered. A small flock of sheep encountered in the north eastern sector is of concern. They had free access to the park via a “kangaroo door” under the boundary fence, something they negotiated with ease when disturbed by a vehicle.

Species of significance were Thelymitra matthewsii and T. epipactoides, these both being nationally threatened species. Historical records existed for T. matthewsii from this park, but it had not been observed for decades, despite intensive searches having occurred following the 2002 burn. Some of this surveys records bear a similarity to historical records but since the latter were recorded prior to accurate global positioning systems it is uncertain about the actual locations. This species was encountered as mainly individual plants in about six different locations, usually in very low numbers. Some plants were just leaf but others were seed capsules. All but one group were located in burn areas, the species being very difficult to observe without the removal of much vegetation. It was noted that some of the area where the species was seen had been slashed. It was felt this could be beneficial to them. Observations in the lower South East seem to reflect this type of disturbance is beneficial to T. matthewsii and Thelymitra in general.

More than 60 plants of T. epipactoides were located in one area of a few hundred meters squared, with the exception of the aforementioned one plant in the 16 month old burn. Despite searching of hectares of similar sedge/rush-land, no others were located. Here again, it was thought that some random slashing of this habitat may benefit orchids that like the open areas, viz. Thelymitra, Diuris sp. Short tailed, Glossodia major, and some Caladenia species.
Present in low numbers on the limestone ridges was Arachnorchis (Caladenia) tensa, another nationally threatened species. Despite its national rating this species is more prolific in South Australia.

Another orchid that appeared in considerable numbers and most habitats was Arachnorchis (Caladenia) sp. South East. It grew as single or few plants right up to sizeable collections of plants, sometimes with up to about 50 in a group. Diuris sp. Short tailed was widespread and moderately common. Glossodia major was encountered as mainly single plants widely scattered. Caladenia carnea was in very high numbers under fairly dense mallee on the northern boundary. Microtis species when it was encountered, was in colonies with high numbers of plants. As a generalisation, Thelymitra were absent or in very low numbers. Exceptions to this were T. antennifera and T. benthamiana which were usually seen in very low numbers but widespread throughout the burn area. It was interesting to note that few of the latter were likely to flower, which contrasts with the 2002 burn when flowering was prolific.

One species promoted to flower by the burn was Prasophyllum elatum. It was widespread in most habitats, but not often in the flats. Plants varied tremendously in size and stature with some quite small plants flowering/going to flower. Predation of the leaves was relatively high, with nearly all being chewed down to between 100 to 150 mm. Buds were emerging from the open top of the leaf, instead of emerging from the side of an intact leaf. There were other Prasophyllum species present, but the survey was just too early to identify what these are likely to be. Most of these were found on the limestone ridges.

The orchid list held by NOSSA for Messent Conservation Park prior to this survey must have been somewhat limited because the number of species on our list has now been doubled. With the rediscovery of T. matthewsii in several locations within the park, the other two nationally threatened species present and the expanded knowledge of orchids within the Park we must consider this was a very successful survey. We thank DENR South East for making this survey possible.

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